Approach

My therapy approach is based on training in both cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic models. As a result, I am able to create an individualized approach for each client based on their specific areas of growth, personality, and desires, while staying attuned to the therapeutic relationship. At times, I may use a structured approach, if dealing with a specific phobia for example, and at others the approach is more flexible, drawing on mindfulness principles to address your concerns. Most importantly, I strive to be present, aware, and compassionate regarding your individual challenges.


Mindfulness
Mindfulness is being in contact with experiences occurring in the present moment, rather than being solely focused on thoughts about the past and the future. With mindful awareness, you can meet your experience, whatever it is, with acceptance and compassion, rather than getting caught in a pattern of avoiding what you don’t want and grasping for what you do.

Mindfulness is a skill that anyone can learn. Just like building a muscle by going to the gym, you can learn to be more present and aware of the habitual patterns that dictate your life, often without your awareness. Mindfulness practice includes sitting meditation or it may be paying attention to the present moment while going about your daily life. One modern therapy approach that uses mindfulness techniques is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).


Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)
ACT is an approach that integrates the science of behavioral psychology and ancient wisdom from mindfulness traditions. ACT provides a framework for describing and cultivating mindfulness, including present moment awareness, acceptance of difficult thoughts and feelings, and self as a larger context than the narrow selves we tend to inhabit.

ACT evolved from the Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) model that targets problematic thoughts and feelings by attempting to change them. ACT instead targets the relationship with thoughts and feelings. Rather than struggle to control one’s internal experience, one can adopt a stance of acceptance, or allowing, of discomfort.

Why allow difficult feelings if they are causing so many problems? The problem is actually not with the feeling or thought itself but in the struggle to control it. Have you ever noticed that trying not to think about something only leads to thinking about it more (“If you don’t want it, you’ve got it”; there are several studies that show this to be true). Once you stop putting energy into an internal battle, you are able to direct more energy to valued activities. This results in a life that is chosen rather than one that is focused on a battle that cannot be won. In fact, the most important values are often connected to the suffering you are trying to get rid of. For example, avoidance of intimacy can lead to a cycle of unhealthy, disconnected relationships, and the pain this causes is directly related to valuing close, connected relationships.


Exposure Therapies
Exposure-based therapy was developed to help people whose fears are interfering with the life they want. This behavioral approach utilizes exposure to a feared object, situation, or memory in order to reduce the power of that feared experience in one’s life. When you confront your fear, rather than avoiding it, new learning can occur that changes your beliefs about both the feared experience and your ability to master it. Exposure-based therapy can be used to treat a range of problems, including Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), phobias (e.g. fear of dogs), and panic disorder.

A key component of exposure-based therapy is to understand how the cycle of avoidance contributes to the problem and why exposure is helpful in disrupting that pattern. Mindfulness is used in conjunction with exposure-based protocols in order to teach important coping skills for dealing with uncomfortable experiences while confronting the feared experience.


Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP)
In FAP, the focus is on creating meaningful, connected relationships. The expectation is that problems that arise in the client’s relationships with others will likely show up between therapist and client at some point. This provides opportunities for feedback in the present moment, in the context of a trusting, supportive relationship. Imagine that you are working with a tennis coach who just tells you how to hit the ball, as opposed to a coach who hits the ball with you while providing feedback to help you hone your skills. This is the benefit of receiving feedback in real time, rather than simply discussing what has or will happen outside of therapy.

Relationship/Couples Therapy
Couples often fall into patterns of responding to their partner based on past experience rather the person that is showing up in the present. Relationship therapy involves becoming aware of these patterns, in order to step out of them, and focuses on increasing meaningful connection in the here and now. When forgiveness is needed, deep listening and validating is crucial for healing the wound and then choosing how to move forward.

Wealth Psychology
Whether you have recently acquired wealth, married into a wealthy family or inherited wealth, understanding your relationship with money is essential to living a vibrant, fulfilling life. While wealth can be leveraged to live life to its fullest, it can also create problems that impact relationships, life satisfaction, and parenting. I will help you relate mindfully to money so that it can support, rather than detract from, a life full of intention and connection.

Mindfulness

Mindfulness is being in contact with experiences occurring in the present moment, rather than being solely focused on thoughts about the past and the future. With mindful awareness, you can meet your experience, whatever it is, with acceptance and compassion, rather than getting caught in a pattern of avoiding what you don’t want and grasping for what you do.

Mindfulness is a skill that anyone can learn. Just like building a muscle by going to the gym, you can learn to be more present and aware of the habitual patterns that dictate your life, often without your awareness. Mindfulness practice includes sitting meditation or it may be paying attention to the present moment while going about your daily life. One modern therapy approach that uses mindfulness techniques is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).


Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

ACT is an approach that integrates the science of behavioral psychology and ancient wisdom from mindfulness traditions. ACT provides a framework for describing and cultivating mindfulness, including present moment awareness, acceptance of difficult thoughts and feelings, and self as a larger context than the narrow selves we tend to inhabit.

ACT evolved from the Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) model that targets problematic thoughts and feelings by attempting to change them. ACT instead targets the relationship with thoughts and feelings. Rather than struggle to control one’s internal experience, one can adopt a stance of acceptance, or allowing, of discomfort.

Why allow difficult feelings if they are causing so many problems? The problem is actually not with the feeling or thought itself but in the struggle to control it. Have you ever noticed that trying not to think about something only leads to thinking about it more (“If you don’t want it, you’ve got it”; there are several studies that show this to be true). Once you stop putting energy into an internal battle, you are able to direct more energy to valued activities. This results in a life that is chosen rather than one that is focused on a battle that cannot be won. In fact, the most important values are often connected to the suffering you are trying to get rid of. For example, avoidance of intimacy can lead to a cycle of unhealthy, disconnected relationships, and the pain this causes is directly related to valuing close, connected relationships.


Exposure Therapies

Exposure-based therapy was developed to help people whose fears are interfering with the life they want. This behavioral approach utilizes exposure to a feared object, situation, or memory in order to reduce the power of that feared experience in one’s life. When you confront your fear, rather than avoiding it, new learning can occur that changes your beliefs about both the feared experience and your ability to master it. Exposure-based therapy can be used to treat a range of problems, including Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), phobias (e.g. fear of dogs), and panic disorder.

A key component of exposure-based therapy is to understand how the cycle of avoidance contributes to the problem and why exposure is helpful in disrupting that pattern. Mindfulness is used in conjunction with exposure-based protocols in order to teach important coping skills for dealing with uncomfortable experiences while confronting the feared experience.


Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP)

In FAP, the focus is on creating meaningful, connected relationships. The expectation is that problems that arise in the client’s relationships with others will likely show up between therapist and client at some point. This provides opportunities for feedback in the present moment, in the context of a trusting, supportive relationship. Imagine that you are working with a tennis coach who just tells you how to hit the ball, as opposed to a coach who hits the ball with you while providing feedback to help you hone your skills. This is the benefit of receiving feedback in real time, rather than simply discussing what has or will happen outside of therapy.


Relationship/Couples Therapy

Couples often fall into patterns of responding to their partner based on past experience rather the person that is showing up in the present. Relationship therapy involves becoming aware of these patterns, in order to step out of them, and focuses on increasing meaningful connection in the here and now. When forgiveness is needed, deep listening and validating is crucial for healing the wound and then choosing how to move forward.


Wealth Psychology

Whether you have recently acquired wealth, married into a wealthy family or inherited wealth, understanding your relationship with money is essential to living a vibrant, fulfilling life. While wealth can be leveraged to live life to its fullest, it can also create problems that impact relationships, life satisfaction, and parenting. I will help you relate mindfully to money so that it can support, rather than detract from, a life full of intention and connection.


“The most precious gift we can offer others is our presence.
When mindfulness embraces those we love, they will bloom like flowers.”

—Thich Nhat Hanh

“The most precious gift we can offer others is our presence. When mindfulness embraces those we love, they will bloom like flowers.”

— Thich Nhat Hanh


Lindsay Fletcher Hardie, Ph.D.
923 Tahoe Blvd, Suite 210, Incline Village, NV 89451  Phone: 775-476-8808